Tag Archives: Willy Oppenheim

Willy Oppenheim’s “Solstice”

Willy Oppenheim is the founder and president of omprakash, a free online platform that connects grassroots health, education, and environmental organizations in over 30 countries with a global audience of volunteers, donors, and classrooms that can learn from and support their work. Willy is also the winner of the 2013 Oxonian Review Poetry Competition at Oxford University for his poem Ambition, which you can find here. Willy is an American Rhodes Scholar reading for a DPhil in Education at Pembroke College, Oxford; he will be defending his thesis there in early 2014. With his permission I will be posting several of his wonderful poems over the next little while.

Solstice

You arrive and arrive.
No heat in moonlit room,
the space between two windows,
the space held by walls and words
we root in.

You go back,
you keep moving,
you walk circles
on frozen ground.

You sleep low
under still air
and want to say
something is teeming,
the world is waiting
to undress in poetry.

You go back to the bookshelves
of people you love
and return to the texture of paper
and return
and no one speaks.

Something is rising there
in the trees;
it makes a round
burning in the cold,
it is the words we carry,
it is the moon.

As with all of Willy’s poems, there is an incredible sense of atmosphere and presence, as if one is standing in a holy spot and is amazed and dumbfounded by the beauty and wonder found there.

Thank you for reading Willy Oppenheim’s “Solstice”. I sincerely hope you have enjoyed it and I humbly appreciate your visiting the Book of Pain. As always, I look forward to your comments.

john

The poem Solstice is ©2013 by Willy Oppenheim; all rights reserved.

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Willy Oppenheim’s “Azan”

This is an amazing poem by an amazing poet. Willy Oppenheim is the winner of the 2013 Oxonian Review Poetry Competition at Oxford University for his poem Ambition, which you can find here. Willy is an American Rhodes Scholar reading for a DPhil in Education at Pembroke College, Oxford. With his permission I will be posting several of his wonderful poems over the next little while.

Azan

This is the good light,
the late light,
the grey-blue dark and cold,
the stone walls and snow
and songs announcing prayer.
This is the narrow frozen path
and the winter we belong to.

Coming back last night
I saw snowy road in headlights
and our silent earth from space
and wanted only to do no hurt.
To take it back,
to send a message
of my prostration.

Instead I returned to the smoke
and woodstove and darkened room
where two days before I watched a girl
bleed out under blankets:
pale face, held hands,
sisters spilling tears
and crying her name.
Dark eyes meeting mine.
The limp body brought out to daylight,
the waiting jeep, dirty hospital down-valley.

I come back to say she will live,
and her mother sings fingers to forehead,
gives praise I accept but don’t deserve.

And so I take what is given.
I look out at old rivers
and what valleys they’ve cut
and at night I see moon through clouds
and undress and lay down
as if it is the only prayer I know to offer,
as if pulling up cold blankets
is the best and last thing I’ll ever do.

Azan was written in Pakistan while Willy was there doing research. It is a poem for which I want to weep after every reading, it is so beautiful.

Besides his current studies, Willy is the founder and current president of omprakash, a platform to connect foreign organizations seeking volunteers with people who want to volunteer abroad. Willy is also an avid rock climber, a passion he is looking forward to pursuing in the upcoming year as his academic pressure has eased with the submission of his thesis, which he will defend in early 2014.

If all this sounds like Willy Oppenheim is the pen name of Clark Kent, I’d almost agree, except for the poetry; Superman couldn’t write this well. Happily, however, for us, Willy can. Check back for more of his work over the next few months. I am very grateful and humbled that a talent of such stature has allowed me to present some of his work to you.

Thank you for reading Willy Oppenheim’s “Azan”. I sincerely hope you have enjoyed it and I humbly appreciate your visiting the Book of Pain. As always, I look forward to your comments.

john

The poem Azan is ©2013 by Willy Oppenheim; all rights reserved.

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